Executive Order on Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad - The White House (2022)

The United States and the world face a profound climate crisis. We have a narrow moment to pursue action at home and abroad in order to avoid the most catastrophic impacts of that crisis and to seize the opportunity that tackling climate changepresents. Domestic action must go hand in handwith United States international leadership, aimed at significantly enhancing global action. Together, we must listento science and meet the moment.

By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, itishereby ordered as follows:

PART I — PUTTING THE CLIMATE CRISIS AT THE CENTER OF UNITEDSTATES FOREIGN POLICY AND NATIONAL SECURITY

Section 101. Policy. United States international engagement to address climate change — which has become aclimate crisis — is more necessary and urgent than ever. Thescientific community has made clear that the scale and speed of necessary action is greater than previously believed. There is little time left to avoid setting the world on a dangerous, potentially catastrophic, climate trajectory. Responding to the climate crisis will require both significant short-term global reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and net-zero global emissions by mid-century or before.

It is the policy of my Administration that climate considerations shall be an essential element of United States foreign policy and national security. The United States will work with other countries and partners, both bilaterally and multilaterally, to put the world on a sustainable climate pathway. The United States will also move quickly to build resilience, both at home and abroad, against the impacts of climate change that are already manifest and will continue tointensify according to current trajectories.

Sec. 102. Purpose. This order builds on and reaffirms actions my Administration has already taken to place the climate crisis at the forefront of this Nation’s foreign policy and national security planning, including submitting the United States instrument of acceptance to rejoin the Paris Agreement. In implementing — and building upon — the Paris Agreement’s three overarching objectives (a safe global temperature, increased climate resilience, and financial flows aligned withapathway toward low greenhouse gas emissions and climate‑resilient development), the United States will exercise its leadership to promote a significant increase in global climate ambition to meet the climate challenge. In this regard:

(a) I will host an early Leaders’ Climate Summit aimed at raising climate ambition and making a positive contribution to the 26th United Nations Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) and beyond.

(b) The United States will reconvene the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate, beginning with the Leaders’ Climate Summit. In cooperation with the members of that Forum, as wellas with other partners as appropriate, the United States will pursue green recovery efforts, initiatives to advance theclean energy transition, sectoral decarbonization, and alignment of financial flows with the objectives of the Paris Agreement, including with respect to coal financing, nature-based solutions, and solutions to other climate-related challenges.

(c) I have created a new Presidentially appointed position, the Special Presidential Envoy for Climate, to elevate the issue of climate change and underscore the commitment my Administration will make toward addressing it.

(d) Recognizing that climate change affects a wide range of subjects, it will be a United States priority to press forenhanced climate ambition and integration of climate considerations across a wide range of international fora, including the Group of Seven (G7), the Group of Twenty (G20), and fora that address clean energy, aviation, shipping, the Arctic, the ocean, sustainable development, migration, and other relevant topics. The Special Presidential Envoy for Climate and others, as appropriate, are encouraged to promote innovative approaches, including international multi-stakeholder initiatives. In addition, my Administration will work in partnership with States, localities, Tribes, territories, and other United States stakeholders to advance United States climate diplomacy.

(e) The United States will immediately begin the process of developing its nationally determined contribution under the Paris Agreement. The process will include analysis and input from relevant executive departments and agencies (agencies), as well as appropriate outreach to domestic stakeholders. The United States will aim to submit its nationally determined contribution in advance of the Leaders’ Climate Summit.

(f) The United States will also immediately begin to develop a climate finance plan, making strategic use of multilateral and bilateral channels and institutions, to assist developing countries in implementing ambitious emissions reduction measures, protecting critical ecosystems, building resilience against the impacts of climate change, and promoting the flow of capital toward climate-aligned investments and away from high-carbon investments. The Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Treasury, in coordination with the Special Presidential Envoy for Climate, shall lead a process to develop this plan, with the participation of the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Chief Executive Officer of the United States International Development Finance Corporation (DFC), the Chief Executive Officer of the Millennium Challenge Corporation, the Director of the United States Trade and Development Agency, the Director of the Office of Management andBudget, and the head of any other agency providing foreign assistance and development financing, as appropriate. The Secretary of State and the Secretary of the Treasury shall submit the plan to the President, through the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs and the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy, within 90 days of the date of this order.

(g) The Secretary of the Treasury shall:

(i) ensure that the United States is present andengaged in relevant international fora and institutions that are working on the management ofclimate-related financial risks;

(ii) develop a strategy for how the voice and vote of the United States can be used in international financial institutions, including the World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund, to promote financing programs, economic stimulus packages, and debt relief initiatives that are aligned with and support the goals of the Paris Agreement; and

(iii) develop, in collaboration with the Secretary ofState, the Administrator of USAID, and the Chief Executive Officer of the DFC, a plan for promoting the protection of the Amazon rainforest and other critical ecosystems that serve as global carbon sinks, including through market-based mechanisms.

(h) The Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, and the Secretary of Energy shall work together and with the Export–Import Bank of the United States, the Chief Executive Officer of the DFC, and the heads of other agencies and partners, as appropriate, to identify steps through which the United States can promote ending international financing of carbon-intensive fossil fuel-based energy while simultaneously advancing sustainable development and a green recovery, in consultation with the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs.

(i) The Secretary of Energy, in cooperation with the Secretary of State and the heads of other agencies, as appropriate, shall identify steps through which the United States can intensify international collaborations to drive innovation and deployment of clean energy technologies, which are critical for climate protection.

(j) The Secretary of State shall prepare, within 60 days of the date of this order, a transmittal package seeking the Senate’s advice and consent to ratification of the Kigali Amendment to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, regarding the phasedown of the production and consumption of hydrofluorocarbons.

Sec. 103. Prioritizing Climate in Foreign Policy and National Security. To ensure that climate change considerations are central to United States foreign policy and national security:

(a) Agencies that engage in extensive international work shall develop, in coordination with the Special Presidential Envoy for Climate, and submit to the President, through the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, within 90 days of the date of this order, strategies and implementation plans for integrating climate considerations into their international work, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law. These strategies and plans should include anassessment of:

(i) climate impacts relevant to broad agency strategies in particular countries or regions;

(ii) climate impacts on their agency-managed infrastructure abroad (e.g., embassies, military installations), without prejudice to existing requirements regarding assessment of such infrastructure;

(iii) how the agency intends to manage such impacts or incorporate risk mitigation into its installation master plans; and

(iv) how the agency’s international work, including partner engagement, can contribute to addressing the climate crisis.

(b) The Director of National Intelligence shall prepare, within 120 days of the date of this order, a National Intelligence Estimate on the national and economic security impacts of climate change.

(c) The Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of Commerce, through the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality, the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, the Director of National Intelligence, the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and the heads of other agencies as appropriate, shall develop and submit to the President, within 120 days of the date of this order, an analysis of the security implications of climate change (Climate Risk Analysis) that can be incorporated into modeling, simulation, war-gaming, and other analyses.

(d) The Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the JointChiefs of Staff shall consider the security implications of climate change, including any relevant information from theClimate Risk Analysis described in subsection (c) of this section, in developing the National Defense Strategy, Defense Planning Guidance, Chairman’s Risk Assessment, and other relevant strategy, planning, and programming documents and processes. Starting in January 2022, the Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff shall provide an annual update, through the National Security Council, on the progress made in incorporating the security implications of climate change into these documents and processes.

(e) The Secretary of Homeland Security shall consider the implications of climate change in the Arctic, along our Nation’s borders, and to National Critical Functions, including any relevant information from the Climate Risk Analysis described in subsection (c) of this section, in developing relevant strategy, planning, and programming documents and processes. Starting in January 2022, the Secretary of Homeland Security shall provide an annual update, through the National Security Council, on the progress made in incorporating the homeland security implications of climate change into these documents and processes.

Sec. 104. Reinstatement. The Presidential Memorandum of September 21, 2016 (Climate Change and National Security), is hereby reinstated.

PART II — TAKING A GOVERNMENT-WIDE APPROACH TO THE CLIMATE CRISIS

Sec. 201. Policy. Even as our Nation emerges from profound public health and economic crises borne of a pandemic, we face a climate crisis that threatens our people and communities, public health and economy, and, starkly, our ability to live on planet Earth. Despite the peril that is already evident, there is promise in the solutions — opportunities to create well-paying union jobs to build a modern and sustainable infrastructure, deliver an equitable, clean energy future, and put the United States on a path to achieve net-zero emissions, economy-wide, by no later than 2050.

We must listen to science — and act. We must strengthen ourclean air and water protections. We must hold polluters accountable for their actions. We must deliver environmental justice in communities all across America. The Federal Government must drive assessment, disclosure, and mitigation ofclimate pollution and climate-related risks in every sector of our economy, marshaling the creativity, courage, and capital necessary to make our Nation resilient in the face of this threat. Together, we must combat the climate crisis with bold,progressive action that combines the full capacity of theFederal Government with efforts from every corner of our Nation, every level of government, and every sector of our economy.

It is the policy of my Administration to organize and deploy the full capacity of its agencies to combat the climate crisis to implement a Government-wide approach that reduces climate pollution in every sector of the economy; increases resilience to the impacts of climate change; protects public health; conserves our lands, waters, and biodiversity; delivers environmental justice; and spurs well-paying union jobs and economic growth, especially through innovation, commercialization, and deployment of clean energy technologies and infrastructure. Successfully meeting these challenges will require the Federal Government to pursue such a coordinated approach from planning to implementation, coupled with substantive engagement by stakeholders, including State, local,and Tribal governments.

(Video) White House Forum on Environmental Justice (Part 1)

Sec. 202. White House Office of Domestic Climate Policy. There is hereby established the White House Office of Domestic Climate Policy (Climate Policy Office) within the Executive Office of the President, which shall coordinate the policy-making process with respect to domestic climate-policy issues; coordinate domestic climate-policy advice to the President; ensure that domestic climate-policy decisions and programs are consistent with the President’s stated goals and that those goals are being effectively pursued; and monitor implementation of the President’s domestic climate-policy agenda. The Climate Policy Office shall have a staff headed by the Assistant to thePresident and National Climate Advisor (National Climate Advisor) and shall include the Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy National Climate Advisor. The Climate Policy Office shall have such staff and other assistance as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this order, subject to the availability of appropriations, and may work with established or ad hoc committees or interagency groups. All agencies shall cooperate with the Climate Policy Office and provide such information, support, and assistance to the Climate Policy Office as it may request, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law.

Sec.203. National Climate Task Force. There is hereby established a National Climate Task Force (Task Force). The Task Force shall be chaired by the National Climate Advisor.

(a) Membership. The Task Force shall consist of the following additional members:

(i) the Secretary of the Treasury;

(ii) the Secretary of Defense;

(iii) the Attorney General;

(iv) the Secretary of the Interior;

(v) the Secretary of Agriculture;

(vi) the Secretary of Commerce;

(vii) the Secretary of Labor;

(viii) the Secretary of Health and Human Services;

(ix) the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development;

(x) the Secretary of Transportation;

(xi) the Secretary of Energy;

(xii) the Secretary of Homeland Security;

(xiii) the Administrator of General Services;

(xiv) the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality;

(xv) the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency;

(xvi) the Director of the Office of Management and Budget;

(xvii) the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy;

(xviii) the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy;

(xix) the Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs;

(xx) the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism; and

(xxi) the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy.

(b) Mission and Work. The Task Force shall facilitate theorganization and deployment of a Government-wide approach tocombat the climate crisis. This Task Force shall facilitate planning and implementation of key Federal actions to reduce climate pollution; increase resilience to the impacts of climate change; protect public health; conserve our lands, waters, oceans, and biodiversity; deliver environmental justice; and spur well-paying union jobs and economic growth. As necessary and appropriate, members of the Task Force will engage on these matters with State, local, Tribal, and territorial governments; workers and communities; and leaders across the various sectors of our economy.

(c) Prioritizing Actions. To the extent permitted by law, Task Force members shall prioritize action on climate change in their policy-making and budget processes, in their contracting and procurement, and in their engagement with State, local, Tribal, and territorial governments; workers and communities; and leaders across all the sectors of our economy.

USE OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT’S BUYING POWER AND REAL PROPERTY AND ASSET MANAGEMENT

Sec. 204. Policy. It is the policy of my Administration to lead the Nation’s effort to combat the climate crisis byexample — specifically, by aligning the management of Federal procurement and real property, public lands and waters, and financial programs to support robust climate action. Byproviding an immediate, clear, and stable source of product demand, increased transparency and data, and robust standards for the market, my Administration will help to catalyze privatesector investment into, and accelerate the advancement of America’s industrial capacity to supply, domestic clean energy, buildings, vehicles, and other necessary products andmaterials.

Sec. 205. Federal Clean Electricity and Vehicle Procurement Strategy. (a) The Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality, the Administrator of General Services, and the Director of the Office and Management and Budget, in coordination with the Secretary of Commerce, the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Energy, and the heads of other relevant agencies, shall assist the National Climate Advisor, through theTask Force established in section 203 of this order, in developing a comprehensive plan to create good jobs and stimulate clean energy industries by revitalizing the Federal Government’s sustainability efforts.

(b) The plan shall aim to use, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law, all available procurement authorities to achieve or facilitate:

(i) a carbon pollution-free electricity sector no later than 2035; and

(ii) clean and zero-emission vehicles for Federal, State, local, and Tribal government fleets, including vehicles of the United States Postal Service.

(c) If necessary, the plan shall recommend any additional legislation needed to accomplish these objectives.

(d) The plan shall also aim to ensure that the UnitedStates retains the union jobs integral to and involved inrunning and maintaining clean and zero-emission fleets, while spurring the creation of union jobs in the manufacture of those new vehicles. The plan shall be submitted to the Task Force within 90 days of the date of this order.

Sec. 206. Procurement Standards. Consistent with the Executive Order of January 25, 2021, entitled, “Ensuring the Future Is Made in All of America by All of America’s Workers,” agencies shall adhere to the requirements of the Made in America Laws in making clean energy, energy efficiency, and clean energy procurement decisions. Agencies shall, consistent with applicable law, apply and enforce the Davis-Bacon Act and prevailing wage and benefit requirements. The Secretary of Labor shall take steps to update prevailing wage requirements. The Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality shall consider additional administrative steps and guidance to assist the Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council in developing regulatory amendments to promote increased contractor attention on reduced carbon emission and Federal sustainability.

(Video) Building Climate Resilience At Home

Sec. 207. Renewable Energy on Public Lands and in Offshore Waters. The Secretary of the Interior shall review siting and permitting processes on public lands and in offshore waters to identify tothe Task Force steps that can be taken, consistent with applicable law, to increase renewable energy production onthose lands and in those waters, with the goal of doubling offshore wind by 2030 while ensuring robust protection for our lands, waters, and biodiversity and creating good jobs. In conducting this review, the Secretary of the Interior shall consult, as appropriate, with the heads of relevant agencies, including the Secretary ofDefense, the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary of Commerce, through the Administrator of the National Oceanic andAtmospheric Administration, the Secretary of Energy, theChair of the Council on Environmental Quality, Stateand Tribal authorities, project developers, and other interested parties. The Secretary of the Interior shall engagewith Tribalauthorities regarding the development andmanagement ofrenewable and conventional energy resources onTribal lands.

Sec. 208. Oil and Natural Gas Development on Public Lands and in Offshore Waters. To the extent consistent with applicable law,the Secretary of the Interior shall pause new oil and natural gas leases on public lands or in offshore waters pending completion of a comprehensive review and reconsideration of Federal oil and gas permitting and leasing practices in lightof the Secretary of the Interior’s broad stewardship responsibilities over the public lands and in offshore waters, including potential climate and other impacts associated with oil and gas activities on public lands or in offshore waters. The Secretary of the Interior shall complete that review in consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary ofCommerce, through theNational Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Secretary of Energy. In conducting this analysis, and to the extent consistent with applicable law, the Secretary of the Interior shall consider whether to adjust royalties associated with coal, oil, and gas resources extracted from public lands and offshore waters, or take other appropriate action, to account for corresponding climate costs.

Sec. 209. Fossil Fuel Subsidies. The heads of agencies shall identify for the Director of the Office of Management andBudget and the National Climate Advisor any fossil fuel subsidies provided by their respective agencies, and then take steps to ensure that, to the extent consistent with applicable law, Federal funding is not directly subsidizing fossil fuels. The Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall seek, in coordination with the heads of agencies and the National Climate Advisor, to eliminate fossil fuel subsidies from the budget request for Fiscal Year 2022 and thereafter.

Sec. 210. Clean Energy in Financial Management. The heads of agencies shall identify opportunities for Federal funding to spur innovation, commercialization, and deployment of clean energy technologies and infrastructure for the Director of theOffice of Management and Budget and the National Climate Advisor, and then take steps to ensure that, to the extent consistent with applicable law, Federal funding is used to spur innovation, commercialization, and deployment of clean energy technologies and infrastructure. The Director of the Office of Management and Budget, in coordination with agency heads and theNational Climate Advisor, shall seek to prioritize such investments in the President’s budget request for Fiscal Year 2022 and thereafter.

Sec. 211. Climate Action Plans and Data and Information Products to Improve Adaptation and Increase Resilience. (a) The head of each agency shall submit a draft action plan to the Task Force and the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer within 120 days of the date of this order that describes steps the agency can take with regard to its facilities and operations tobolster adaptation and increase resilience to the impacts ofclimate change. Action plans should, among other things, describe the agency’s climate vulnerabilities and describe the agency’s plan to use the power of procurement to increase the energy and water efficiency of United States Government installations, buildings, and facilities and ensure they are climate-ready. Agencies shall consider the feasibility of using the purchasing power of the Federal Government to drive innovation, and shall seek to increase the Federal Government’s resilience against supply chain disruptions. Such disruptions put the Nation’s manufacturing sector at risk, as well as consumer access to critical goods and services. Agencies shall make their action plans public, and post them on the agency website, to the extent consistent with applicable law.

(b) Within 30 days of an agency’s submission of an action plan, the Federal Chief Sustainability Officer, in coordination with the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, shall review the plan to assess its consistency with the policy set forth in section 204 of this order and the priorities issued by the Office of Management and Budget.

(c) After submitting an initial action plan, the head of each agency shall submit to the Task Force and Federal Chief Sustainability Officer progress reports annually on the status of implementation efforts. Agencies shall make progress reports public and post them on the agency website, to the extent consistent with applicable law. The heads of agencies shall assign their respective agency Chief Sustainability Officer the authority to perform duties relating to implementation of this order within the agency, to the extent consistent with applicable law.

(d) To assist agencies and State, local, Tribal, and territorial governments, communities, and businesses in preparing for and adapting to the impacts of climate change, theSecretary of Commerce, through the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Secretary of Homeland Security, through the Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, in coordination with the heads of other agencies, as appropriate, shall provide to the Task Force a report on ways to expand and improve climate forecast capabilities and information products for the public. In addition, the Secretary of the Interior and the Deputy Director for Management of the Office of Management and Budget, in their capacities as the Chair and Vice-Chair of the Federal Geographic Data Committee, shall assess and provide to the Task Force a report on the potential development of a consolidated Federal geographic mapping service that can facilitate public access to climate-related information that will assist Federal, State, local, and Tribal governments in climate planning and resilience activities.

EMPOWERING WORKERS THROUGH REBUILDING OUR INFRASTRUCTURE FOR ASUSTAINABLE ECONOMY

Sec. 212. Policy. This Nation needs millions of construction, manufacturing, engineering, and skilled-trades workers to build a new American infrastructure and clean energy economy. These jobs will create opportunities for young people and for older workers shifting to new professions, and for people from all backgrounds and communities. Such jobs will bring opportunity to communities too often left behind — places that have suffered as a result of economic shifts and places that have suffered the most from persistent pollution, including low-income rural and urban communities, communities of color, and Native communities.

Sec. 213. Sustainable Infrastructure. (a) The Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality and the Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall take steps, consistent with applicable law, to ensure that Federal infrastructure investment reduces climate pollution, and to require that Federal permitting decisions consider the effects of greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. In addition, they shall review, and report to the National Climate Advisor on, siting and permitting processes, including those in progress under the auspices of the Federal Permitting Improvement Steering Council, and identify steps that can be taken, consistent with applicable law, to accelerate the deployment of clean energy and transmission projects in an environmentally stable manner.

(b) Agency heads conducting infrastructure reviews shall, as appropriate, consult from an early stage with State, local, and Tribal officials involved in permitting or authorizing proposed infrastructure projects to develop efficient timelines for decision-making that are appropriate given the complexities of proposed projects.

EMPOWERING WORKERS BY ADVANCING CONSERVATION, AGRICULTURE, AND REFORESTATION

Sec. 214. Policy. It is the policy of my Administration to put a new generation of Americans to work conserving our public lands and waters. The Federal Government must protect America’s natural treasures, increase reforestation, improve access to recreation, and increase resilience to wildfires andstorms, while creating well-paying union jobs for more Americans, including more opportunities for women and people of color in occupations where they are underrepresented. America’s farmers, ranchers, and forest landowners have an important role to play in combating the climate crisis and reducing greenhouse gas emissions, by sequestering carbon in soils, grasses, trees, and other vegetation and sourcing sustainable bioproducts and fuels. Coastal communities have an essential role to play in mitigating climate change and strengthening resilience by protecting and restoring coastal ecosystems, such as wetlands, seagrasses, coral and oyster reefs, and mangrove and kelp forests, to protect vulnerable coastlines, sequester carbon, andsupport biodiversity and fisheries.

Sec. 215. Civilian Climate Corps. In furtherance of the policy set forth in section 214 of this order, the Secretary ofthe Interior, in collaboration with the Secretary of Agriculture and the heads of other relevant agencies, shall submit a strategy to the Task Force within 90 days of the date of this order for creating a Civilian Climate Corps Initiative, within existing appropriations, to mobilize the next generation of conservation and resilience workers and maximize the creation of accessible training opportunities and good jobs. The initiative shall aim to conserve and restore public lands and waters, bolster community resilience, increase reforestation, increase carbon sequestration in the agricultural sector, protect biodiversity, improve access to recreation, and address the changing climate.

Sec. 216. Conserving Our Nation’s Lands and Waters. (a) The Secretary of the Interior, in consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary of Commerce, the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality, and the heads of other relevant agencies, shall submit a report to the Task Force within 90 days of the date of this order recommending steps thatthe United States should take, working with State, local, Tribal, and territorial governments, agricultural and forest landowners, fishermen, and other key stakeholders, to achieve the goal of conserving at least 30 percent of our lands and waters by 2030.

(i) The Secretary of the Interior, the Secretary of Agriculture, the Secretary of Commerce, through the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality shall, as appropriate, solicit input from State, local, Tribal, and territorial officials, agricultural and forest landowners, fishermen, and other key stakeholders in identifying strategies that will encourage broad participation in the goal of conserving 30 percent ofour lands and waters by 2030.

(ii) The report shall propose guidelines for determining whether lands and waters qualify for conservation, and it also shall establish mechanisms to measure progress toward the 30-percent goal. The Secretary of the Interior shall subsequently submit annual reports to the Task Force to monitor progress.

(b) The Secretary of Agriculture shall:

(i) initiate efforts in the first 60 days from the date of this order to collect input from Tribes, farmers, ranchers, forest owners, conservation groups, firefighters, and other stakeholders on how to best use Department of Agriculture programs, funding and financing capacities, and other authorities, and how to encourage the voluntary adoption of climate-smart agricultural and forestry practices that decrease wildfire risk fueled by climate change and result in additional, measurable, and verifiable carbon reductions and sequestration and that source sustainable bioproducts and fuels; and

(ii) submit to the Task Force within 90 days of the date of this order a report making recommendations for an agricultural and forestry climate strategy.

(c) The Secretary of Commerce, through the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, shall initiate efforts in the first 60 days from the date of this order to collect input from fishermen, regional ocean councils, fishery management councils, scientists, and other stakeholders on how to make fisheries and protected resources more resilient to climate change, including changes in management and conservation measures, and improvements in science, monitoring, and cooperative research.

EMPOWERING WORKERS THROUGH REVITALIZING ENERGY COMMUNITIES

Sec. 217. Policy. It is the policy of my Administration to improve air and water quality and to create well-paying union jobs and more opportunities for women and people of color in hard-hit communities, including rural communities, while reducing methane emissions, oil and brine leaks, and other environmental harms from tens of thousands of former mining and well sites. Mining and power plant workers drove the industrial revolution and the economic growth that followed, and have been essential to the growth of the United States. As the Nation shifts to a clean energy economy, Federal leadership is essential to foster economic revitalization of and investment inthese communities, ensure the creation of good jobs that provide a choice to join a union, and secure the benefits that have been earned by workers.

Such work should include projects that reduce emissions oftoxic substances and greenhouse gases from existing and abandoned infrastructure and that prevent environmental damage that harms communities and poses a risk to public health and safety. Plugging leaks in oil and gas wells and reclaiming abandoned mine land can create well-paying union jobs in coal, oil, and gas communities while restoring natural assets, revitalizing recreation economies, and curbing methane emissions. In addition, such work should include efforts to turn properties idled in these communities, such as brownfields, into new hubs for the growth of our economy. Federal agencies should therefore coordinate investments and other efforts to assist coal, oil and gas, and power plant communities, and achieve substantial reductions of methane emissions from the oil and gas sector as quickly as possible.

Sec. 218. Interagency Working Group on Coal and Power Plant Communities and Economic Revitalization. There is hereby established an Interagency Working Group on Coal and Power Plant Communities and Economic Revitalization (Interagency Working Group). The National Climate Advisor and the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy shall serve as Co-Chairs of the Interagency Working Group.

(a) Membership. The Interagency Working Group shall consist of the following additional members:

(i) the Secretary of the Treasury;

(ii) the Secretary of the Interior;

(iii) the Secretary of Agriculture;

(iv) the Secretary of Commerce;

(v) the Secretary of Labor;

(vi) the Secretary of Health and Human Services;

(vii) the Secretary of Transportation;

(viii) the Secretary of Energy;

(Video) President Biden signs CHIPS and Science Act of 2022 into law

(ix) the Secretary of Education;

(x) the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency;

(xi) the Director of the Office of Management and Budget;

(xii) the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy and Director of the Domestic Policy Council; and

(xiii) the Federal Co-Chair of the Appalachian Regional Commission.

(b) Mission and Work.

(i) The Interagency Working Group shall coordinate the identification and delivery of Federal resources to revitalize the economies of coal, oil and gas, andpower plant communities; develop strategies to implement the policy set forth in section 217 of this order and for economic and social recovery; assess opportunities to ensure benefits and protections for coal and power plant workers; and submit reports to the National Climate Advisor and the Assistant to thePresident for Economic Policy on a regular basis on the progress of the revitalization effort.

(ii) As part of this effort, within 60 days of the date of this order, the Interagency Working Group shall submit a report to the President describing allmechanisms, consistent with applicable law, to prioritize grantmaking, Federal loan programs, technical assistance, financing, procurement, or other existing programs to support and revitalize the economies of coal and power plant communities, and providing recommendations for action consistent with the goals of the Interagency Working Group.

(c) Consultation. Consistent with the objectives set outin this order and in accordance with applicable law, the Interagency Working Group shall seek the views of State, local,and Tribal officials; unions; environmental justice organizations; community groups; and other persons it identifies who may have perspectives on the mission of the Interagency Working Group.

(d) Administration. The Interagency Working Group shall be housed within the Department of Energy. The Chairs shall convene regular meetings of the Interagency Working Group, determine its agenda, and direct its work. The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Chairs, shall designate an Executive Director of the Interagency Working Group, who shall coordinate the work of the Interagency Working Group and head any staff assigned to the Interagency Working Group.

(e) Officers. To facilitate the work of the Interagency Working Group, the head of each agency listed in subsection (a) of this section shall assign a designated official within the agency the authority to represent the agency on the Interagency Working Group and perform such other duties relating to the implementation of this order within the agency as the head of the agency deems appropriate.

SECURING ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE AND SPURRING ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITY

Sec. 219. Policy. To secure an equitable economic future, the United States must ensure that environmental and economic justice are key considerations in how we govern. That means investing and building a clean energy economy that creates well‑paying union jobs, turning disadvantaged communities — historically marginalized and overburdened — into healthy, thriving communities, and undertaking robust actions to mitigate climate change while preparing for the impacts of climate change across rural, urban, and Tribal areas. Agencies shall make achieving environmental justice part of their missions by developing programs, policies, and activities to address the disproportionately high and adverse human health, environmental, climate-related and other cumulative impacts on disadvantaged communities, as well as the accompanying economic challenges of such impacts. It is therefore the policy of my Administration to secure environmental justice and spur economic opportunity for disadvantaged communities that have been historically marginalized and overburdened by pollution and underinvestment in housing, transportation, water and wastewater infrastructure, and health care.

Sec. 220. White House Environmental Justice Interagency Council. (a) Section 1-102 of Executive Order 12898 of February 11, 1994 (Federal Actions To Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations), ishereby amended to read as follows:

“(a) There is hereby created within the Executive Office of the President a White House Environmental Justice Interagency Council (Interagency Council). The Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality shall serve as Chair of the Interagency Council.

“(b) Membership. The Interagency Council shall consist of the following additional members:

(i) the Secretary of Defense;

(ii) the Attorney General;

(iii) the Secretary of the Interior;

(iv) the Secretary of Agriculture;

(v) the Secretary of Commerce;

(vi) the Secretary of Labor;

(vii) the Secretary of Health and Human Services;

(viii) the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development;

(ix) the Secretary of Transportation;

(x) the Secretary of Energy;

(xi) the Chair of the Council of Economic Advisers;

(xii) the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency;

(xiii) the Director of the Office of Management and Budget;

(xiv) the Executive Director of the Federal Permitting Improvement Steering Council;

(xv) the Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy;

(xvi) the National Climate Advisor;

(xvii) the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy; and

(xviii) the Assistant to the President for Economic Policy.

“(c) At the direction of the Chair, the Interagency Council may establish subgroups consisting exclusively of Interagency Council members or their designees under this section, as appropriate.

(Video) EnvironmentalJusticeatEPA

“(d) Mission and Work. The Interagency Council shall develop a strategy to address current and historic environmental injustice by consulting with the White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council and with local environmental justice leaders. The Interagency Council shall also develop clear performance metrics to ensure accountability, and publish an annual public performance scorecard on its implementation.

“(e) Administration. The Office of Administration within the Executive Office of the President shall provide funding and administrative support for the Interagency Council, to the extent permitted by law and within existing appropriations. Tothe extent permitted by law, including the Economy Act (31 U.S.C. 1535), and subject to the availability of appropriations, the Department of Labor, the Department of Transportation, and the Environmental Protection Agency shall provide administrative support as necessary.

“(f) Meetings and Staff. The Chair shall convene regular meetings of the Council, determine its agenda, and direct its work. The Chair shall designate an Executive Director of the Council, who shall coordinate the work of the Interagency Council and head any staff assigned to the Council.

“(g) Officers. To facilitate the work of the Interagency Council, the head of each agency listed in subsection (b) shallassign a designated official within the agency to be an Environmental Justice Officer, with the authority to represent the agency on the Interagency Council and perform such other duties relating to the implementation of this order within the agency as the head of the agency deems appropriate.”

(b) The Interagency Council shall, within 120 days of thedate of this order, submit to the President, through the National Climate Advisor, a set of recommendations for further updating Executive Order 12898.

Sec. 221. White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council. There is hereby established, within the Environmental Protection Agency, the White House Environmental Justice Advisory Council (Advisory Council), which shall advise the Interagency Council and the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality.

(a) Membership. Members shall be appointed by the President, shall be drawn from across the political spectrum, and may include those with knowledge about or experience in environmental justice, climate change, disaster preparedness, racial inequity, or any other area determined by the President to be of value to the Advisory Council.

(b) Mission and Work. The Advisory Council shall be solely advisory. It shall provide recommendations to the White House Environmental Justice Interagency Council established in section 220 of this order on how to increase the Federal Government’s efforts to address current and historic environmental injustice, including recommendations for updating Executive Order 12898.

(c) Administration. The Environmental Protection Agencyshall provide funding and administrative support for theAdvisory Council to the extent permitted by law and within existing appropriations. Members of the Advisory Council shall serve without either compensation or reimbursement of expenses.

(d) Federal Advisory Committee Act. Insofar as the Federal Advisory Committee Act, as amended (5 U.S.C. App.), mayapply to the Advisory Council, any functions of the President under the Act, except for those in section 6 of theAct, shall be performed by the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency in accordance with the guidelines that have been issued by the Administrator of GeneralServices.

Sec. 222. Agency Responsibilities. In furtherance of the policy set forth in section 219:

(a) The Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality shall, within 6 months of the date of this order, create a geospatial Climate and Economic Justice Screening Tool and shall annually publish interactive maps highlighting disadvantaged communities.

(b) The Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency shall, within existing appropriations and consistent withapplicable law:

(i) strengthen enforcement of environmental violations with disproportionate impact on underserved communities through the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance; and

(ii) create a community notification program to monitor and provide real-time data to the public on current environmental pollution, including emissions, criteria pollutants, and toxins, in frontline and fenceline communities — places with the most significant exposure to such pollution.

(c) The Attorney General shall, within existing appropriations and consistent with applicable law:

(i) consider renaming the Environment and Natural Resources Division the Environmental Justice and Natural Resources Division;

(ii) direct that division to coordinate with the Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, through the Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, as well as with other client agencies as appropriate, to develop a comprehensive environmental justice enforcement strategy, which shall seek to provide timely remedies for systemic environmental violations and contaminations, and injury to natural resources; and

(iii) ensure comprehensive attention to environmental justice throughout the Department of Justice, including by considering creating an Office of Environmental Justice within the Department to coordinate environmental justice activities among Department of Justice components and United States Attorneys’ Offices nationwide.

(d) The Secretary of Health and Human Services shall, consistent with applicable law and within existing appropriations:

(i) establish an Office of Climate Change and Health Equity to address the impact of climate change on the health of the American people; and

(ii) establish an Interagency Working Group to Decrease Risk of Climate Change to Children, the Elderly, People with Disabilities, and the Vulnerable as well as a biennial Health Care System Readiness Advisory Council, both of which shall report their progress and findings regularly to the Task Force.

(e) The Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy shall, in consultation with the National Climate Advisor, within existing appropriations, and within 100 days of the dateof this order, publish a report identifying the climate strategies and technologies that will result in the most air and water quality improvements, which shall be made public to the maximum extent possible and published on the Office’s website.

Sec. 223. Justice40 Initiative. (a) Within 120 days ofthe date of this order, the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and the National Climate Advisor, in consultation with the Advisory Council, shall jointly publish recommendations on how certain Federal investments might be made toward a goal that 40percent of the overall benefits flow to disadvantaged communities. The recommendations shall focus on investments in the areas of clean energy and energy efficiency; clean transit; affordable and sustainable housing; training and workforce development; the remediation and reduction of legacy pollution; and the development of critical clean water infrastructure. The recommendations shall reflect existing authorities the agencies may possess for achieving the 40-percent goal as well as recommendations on any legislation needed to achieve the 40‑percent goal.

(b) In developing the recommendations, the Chair of the Council on Environmental Quality, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and the National Climate Advisor shall consult with affected disadvantaged communities.

(c) Within 60 days of the recommendations described in subsection (a) of this section, agency heads shall identify applicable program investment funds based on the recommendations and consider interim investment guidance to relevant program staff, as appropriate and consistent with applicable law.

(d) By February 2022, the Director of the Office of Management and Budget, in coordination with the Chair of theCouncil on Environmental Quality, the Administrator of theUnited States Digital Service, and other relevant agency heads, shall, to the extent consistent with applicable law, publish on a public website an annual Environmental Justice Scorecard detailing agency environmental justice performance measures.

PART III — GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 301. General Provisions. (a) Nothing in this order shall be construed to impair or otherwise affect:

(i) the authority granted by law to an executive department or agency or the head thereof; or

(ii) the functions of the Director of the Office ofManagement and Budget, relating to budgetary, administrative, or legislative proposals.

(b) This order shall be implemented consistent with applicable law and subject to the availability of appropriations.

(c) This order is not intended to, and does not, create any right or benefit, substantive or procedural, enforceable at law or in equity by any party against the United States, its departments, agencies, or entities, its officers, employees, or agents, or any other person.

JOSEPH R. BIDEN JR.

THE WHITE HOUSE,

(Video) President Biden Delivers Remarks and Signs Executive Actions

January 27, 2021.

FAQs

Which executive branch is involved in climate change? ›

The Office of Global Change is responsible for implementing and managing U.S. international policy on climate change, and representing the United States in negotiations under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), and in many other international fora focused on climate change, including the ...

What are the steps taken by the government to stop global warming? ›

National Mission for Enhanced Energy Efficiency. National Mission on Sustainable Habitat. National Water Mission. National Mission for Sustaining the Himalayan Eco-system.

How does Biden help environment? ›

Ramp up clean electricity standards to 55% by 2025, 75% by 2030, and 100% by 2035: Off Track. President Biden has reiterated his goal to reach 100% clean electricity by 2035 and signed an executive order requiring federal agencies to procure 100% carbon pollution-free electricity by 2030.

What are the two actions individuals and governments can take to reduce climate change? ›

  • Make your voice heard by those in power. ...
  • Eat less meat and dairy. ...
  • Cut back on flying. ...
  • Leave the car at home. ...
  • Reduce your energy use, and bills. ...
  • Respect and protect green spaces. ...
  • Invest your money responsibly. ...
  • Cut consumption – and waste.

What is the federal government doing for climate change? ›

Buildings Sector

Expanded a program to help families weatherize homes with a $3 billion Bipartisan Infrastructure Law investment in the Weatherization Assistance Program to increase energy efficiency, make homes healthier, and lower energy bills for thousands of American families.

What laws have been passed for climate change? ›

Some major milestones on climate in Congress include:
  • 1992: Senate approves U.N. ...
  • 1992: Renewable energy gets a boost. ...
  • 1997: Senate pre-empts Kyoto Protocol. ...
  • 2003-2007: Bipartisan bills in the Senate. ...
  • 2007: Congress mandates emissions reporting. ...
  • 2008–2010: Cap-and-trade legislation passes the House.

What is the mission of National Action Plan on Climate Change 12? ›

Great importance has been given to the National Solar Mission in the NAPCC. The objective of the mission is to increase the share of solar energy in the total energy mix of the country, while also expanding the scope of other renewable sources.

What are the steps taken by Government to protect environment? ›

Protection of Environment
  • Special Purpose Vehicle (SPV) for Afforestation.
  • Fly Ash Utilisation Action Plan.
  • Initiatives for improving the environmental performance of coal based stations.
  • Clean Development Mechanism (CDM)
  • ISO 14001.

Who is responsible for global warming Government or public? ›

The responsibility for tackling climate change lies with decision-makers, industry, and ordinary citizens. However, the problem has been that so far, no agreement has been reached on who should act and how. Citizens are told to recycle, reduce flying and favour public transport.

What is in the Green New Deal bill? ›

"Providing all people of the United States with – (i) high-quality health care; (ii) affordable, safe, and adequate housing; (iii) economic security; and (iv) access to clean water, clean air, healthy and affordable food, and nature."

What was the environmental policy of Barack Obama? ›

The Climate Action Plan is an environmental plan by Barack Obama, the 44th President of the United States, that proposed a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. It included preserving forests, encouraging the use of alternate fuels, and increased study of climate change.

Did build back better pass bill? ›

Following negotiations, the price was lowered to approximately $2.2 trillion. The bill was passed 220–213 by the House of Representatives on November 19, 2021. To provide for reconciliation pursuant to title II of S. Con.

What is the most effective solution to climate change? ›

Cutting carbon is the only long-term solution for avoiding climate impacts. In the short-term, we need to adapt. That means everything from discouraging development in high-risk areas, to planning for water scarcity, to building more resilient cities and communities.

What are five things governments can do to help the environment? ›

Things the government can do to help the environment
  • Encourage Environmentally Friendly Employee Practices. ...
  • Making Environmentally Friendly Changes in Local Government Facilities. ...
  • Foster Clean Commute Initiatives. ...
  • Software Solutions Help to Reduce the Local Government Carbon Footprint.
Feb 13, 2019

What is the climate emergency act? ›

This bill directs the President to declare a national emergency with respect to climate change.

Does the US have a climate change Act? ›

High Global Warming Chemicals

On September 23, 2021, EPA issued a final rule that will phase down the U.S. production and consumption of HFCs by 85% over the next 15 years, as mandated by the AIM Act. A global phasedown of HFCs is expected to avoid up to 0.5°C of global warming by 2100.

Are there international laws on climate change? ›

Avoiding the most dangerous impacts from climate change has been a major focus of international environment law since the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (the UNFCCC), which recognized climate change as "a common concern of humankind" and set out a framework for global action to avoid harmful ...

What is the main aim of this national action plan on climate change? ›

National Mission for Sustainable Agriculture: The NAPCC aims to support climate adaptation in agriculture through the development of climate-resilient crops, expansion of weather insurance mechanisms, and agricultural practices.

Which of the following missions is not listed under national action plan on climate change? ›

National Mission on Solid Waste Management is NOT one of the missions under the National Action Plan on climate change. The National Action Plan on Climate change (NAPCC) identifies measures that promote development objectives while also yielding co-benefits for addressing climate change.

How many missions are there in national action plan on climate change? ›

The plan will rely on the support from the developed countries with the prime focus of keeping its carbon emissions below the developed economies at any point of time. The 8 missions under NAPCC are as follows: National Solar Mission.

What are the powers of the Central Government U S 3 3 of the Environment Protection Act 1986 for protection and improvement of the environment? ›

(1) Subject to the provisions of this Act, the Central Government shall have the power to take all such measures as it deems necessary or expedient for the purpose of protecting and improving the quality of the environment and preventing, controlling and abating environmental pollution.

What are the four policies of environment? ›

Eccleston identifies and describes four of the most critical environmental policy issues facing humanity: water scarcity, food scarcity, climate change, and the population paradox.

Who is more responsible for protecting the environment individuals or government? ›

Two-thirds of Democrats and independents say the environment is the responsibility of the government, while a majority, 57 percent, of Republicans consider it an obligation of individuals.

Which country is most responsible for climate change? ›

  1. The United States. The U.S. is the largest emitter of CO2, with approximately 416,738 metric tons of total carbon dioxide emissions by 2020. ...
  2. China. China is the second-largest emitter of carbon dioxide gas in the world, with 235,527 metric tons by 2020. ...
  3. The Russian Federation. ...
  4. Germany. ...
  5. The United Kingdom.

Who is the most responsible for global warming? ›

But China is today's biggest emitter, by a mile.

In 2014, China released 10.3 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels and industry; the United States released more than 5.2 billion metric tons that year.

Who or what is to blame for global warming? ›

Fossil fuel firms clearly play a major role in the climate problem. A major report released in 2017 attributed 70% of the world's greenhouse gas emissions over the previous two decades to just 100 fossil fuel producers. An update last year outlined the top 20 fossil fuel firms behind a third of emissions.

Was the new deal approved by Congress? ›

New Deal programs included both laws passed by Congress as well as presidential executive orders during the first term of the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Has the Green New Deal been voted on? ›

On March 26, 2019, the Senate voted on the Green New Deal resolution.

What is the Green Deal scheme? ›

The Green Deal was a government scheme that provided loans to households to finance energy-efficient home improvements. The loan was designed to be paid back through the savings made on energy bills. The original scheme ran from 2013 to July 2015, when the government stopped supporting the Green Deal Finance Company.

When was the Climate Action Plan created? ›

Fact Sheet | Timeline of Progress Made in President Obama's Climate Action Plan. On June 25th, 2013, President Obama announced his Climate Action Plan (CAP) during a speech at Georgetown University.

What are the major features of President Obama's energy plan? ›

The President's Clean Power Plan
  • Expanding the Clean Energy Economy. ...
  • Building Clean Energy Infrastructure. ...
  • Cutting energy waste in homes, businesses, and factories. ...
  • Reducing other greenhouse gas emissions.

What is Obama's Clean Power Plan? ›

The Clean Power Plan was an Obama administration policy aimed at combating anthropogenic climate change (global warming) that was first proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in June 2014. The final version of the plan was unveiled by President Obama on August 3, 2015.

What US Agency studies the climate? ›

EPA research improves knowledge of the impacts of climate change on human health and the environment. The scientific information and tools can be used by communities to effectively, equitably and sustainably tackle the climate crisis.

What does the EPA do? ›

The EPA provides environmental data, assessments and evidence to inform decision making and implements effective regulation and environmental compliance systems – while working with others to advocate for a clean, healthy and well protected environment and sustainable environmental behaviour.

Who all is in the executive branch? ›

The executive branch carries out and enforces laws. It includes the president, vice president, the Cabinet, executive departments, independent agencies, and other boards, commissions, and committees. American citizens have the right to vote for the president and vice president through free, confidential ballots.

What is the meaning of DENR? ›

The Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) is responsible for the conservation, management, and development of the country's environment and natural resources.

Who is most responsible for climate change? ›

In first place on the rankings, the US has released more than 509GtCO2 since 1850 and is responsible for the largest share of historical emissions, Carbon Brief analysis shows, with some 20% of the global total.

Is the US involved in the Kyoto Protocol? ›

The Kyoto Protocol was the first major international effort to slow global climate change. Since 1997, 191 countries have backed the agreement, though the United States has not.

Who is responsible for global warming government or public? ›

The responsibility for tackling climate change lies with decision-makers, industry, and ordinary citizens. However, the problem has been that so far, no agreement has been reached on who should act and how. Citizens are told to recycle, reduce flying and favour public transport.

What does environmental protection Act 1986 say? ›

The Environment (Protection) Act, 1986 authorizes the central government to protect and improve environmental quality, control and reduce pollution from all sources, and prohibit or restrict the setting and /or operation of any industrial facility on environmental grounds.

What are the three important environmental laws? ›

The six laws related to environmental protection and wildlife are: The Environment (Protection) Act, 1986; The Forest (Conservation) Act, 1980; The Wildlife Protection Act, 1972; Water (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1974; Air (Prevention and Control of Pollution) Act, 1981 and The Indian Forest Act, 1927.

What are 3 major responsibilities of the EPA? ›

The Environmental Protection Agency protects people and the environment from significant health risks, sponsors and conducts research, and develops and enforces environmental regulations.

What is the most powerful branch of government? ›

Stanford historian Jack Rakove says that the presidency has emerged as the strongest of all three branches of the U.S. government, due to partisanship in Congress.

How can a president be removed from office? ›

Article II, Section 4: The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

Can the president declare war? ›

Only Congress can declare war and appropriate military funding, yet the president is commander in chief of the armed forces.

What is the role of DENR in disaster prevention and mitigation? ›

The DENR is tasked to lead the Cabinet Cluster on CCAM-DRR as well as oversee the implementation of the Program Convergence Budgeting for the said cluster.

What is PRS 192? ›

PROVIDING FOR THE REORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT. OF ENVIRONMENT, ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES. RENAMING IT AS THE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENT AND. NATURAL RESOURCES, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES.

Which agency is responsible for environmental rules? ›

The primary institutions responsible for the formulation and enforcement of environmental acts and rules include the Ministry of Environment and Forests (MOEF), the Central Pollution Control Board (CPCB), State Departments of Environment, State Pollution Control Boards (SPCBs) and Municipal Corporations.

Videos

1. Joe Biden speaks at virtual climate leader's summit – watch live
(Guardian News)
2. U.S. Department of Energy’s Carbon Negative Shot Summit
(U.S. Department of Energy)
3. Environmental Justice Under the Biden Administration
(Bracewell LLP)
4. Justice40: The Path Forward for the Administration’s Environmental Justice Initiative
(eesionline)
5. PBS NewsHour full episode, Aug. 8, 2022
(PBS NewsHour)
6. Health Care Sector Pledge Initiative Webinar | May 5, 2022
(U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Twana Towne Ret

Last Updated: 09/07/2022

Views: 5847

Rating: 4.3 / 5 (64 voted)

Reviews: 87% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Twana Towne Ret

Birthday: 1994-03-19

Address: Apt. 990 97439 Corwin Motorway, Port Eliseoburgh, NM 99144-2618

Phone: +5958753152963

Job: National Specialist

Hobby: Kayaking, Photography, Skydiving, Embroidery, Leather crafting, Orienteering, Cooking

Introduction: My name is Twana Towne Ret, I am a famous, talented, joyous, perfect, powerful, inquisitive, lovely person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.